Women's Studies (AC)

For students who want expertise in women's issues, this Academic Concentration may be earned along with a regular A.A. degree, and will be awarded upon graduation.

Core Courses 1
WS   101INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S STUDIES5
WS   201WOMEN AROUND THE WORLD3
WS   220RACE, CLASS, GENDER AND SEXUALITY5
Electives
Select at least three credits/units from the following: 29-11
WOMEN ARTISTS THROUGH HISTORY (5 credits/units)
WOMEN IN LITERATURE (3 credits/units)
INTRODUCTION TO LGBTQ STUDIES (5 credits/units)
INTRODUCTION TO QUEER LITERATURE (3 credits/units)
WOMEN IN U.S. HISTORY (5 credits/units)
WOMEN IN WORLD HISTORY I (5 credits/units)
WOMEN IN WORLD HISTORY II (5 credits/units)
WOMEN'S HEALTH (2 credits/units)
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE (5 credits/units)
WOMEN'S CULTURE (3 credits/units)
RACISM & WHITE PRIVILEGE IN THE U.S. (3 credits/units)
SELECTED TOPICS (1-3 credits/units)
SPECIAL PROJECTS (1-5 credits/units)
Total Credits/Units22-24

Program Outcomes

Program outcomes are overarching skills that are emphasized and reinforced throughout several courses in a specific program; they are measurable statements that define what students should know or be able to do by the end of a certificate or degree at Clark College. After successful completion of this program, students will be able to:

  • Describe foundational concepts in Women's Studies such as: the personal is political; the waves of feminism; the diversity of women's experiences; the difference between sex and gender; the history of feminist activism for social justice; and, women's contributions to culture, politics, history, etc.
  • Explain the social construction of identity and difference, analyzing power, privilege and inequality from feminist theoretical perspectives, distinguishing the intersections between gender and other social and cultural identities, such as race, sex, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, class, ability and sexuality, and locating oneself within the hierarchy of identities.
  • Analyze institutional, ideological, and individual components that maintain or challenge systems of oppression in contemporary U.S. society and throughout the world.