Mechanical, Civil & Aeronautical Engineering (AST2)

Academic Plans, known as programs, include a overview description and a summary of program requirements. You can search the online catalog via the the Academic Plan links on the right for a desired program or a specific course information. 

The following is a degree program designed by a consortium of two-year and four-year colleges in Washington. Students should be aware that baccalaureate institutions may have slightly different requirements for these degrees, and students should consult the transfer institution for exact questions. Additional courses may be needed to satisfy graduation requirements for the Associate in Science degree.  

Students should complete the entirety of any science sequence at the same school for best transferability. These degrees are not DTA degrees, and there are some general education requirements that students will need to finish upon transfer.

Though this degree does not require such, Clark College students should know that the standard Clark AST degree path has this difference from the Articulated Degree defined below:

  • Clark requires 3 credits of Health-Physical Education coursework.

Students must also meet the residency requirements as established by Clark. While Clark College has approved offering the degree below, Clark students should keep these requirements in mind should their transfer pathways change.

Students completing this Associate of Science will receive the same priority consideration for admission to the baccalaureate institution as they would for completing the direct transfer associate degree and will be given junior status by the receiving institution.

Clark College Equivalents

Communication Skills
ENGL&101ENGLISH COMPOSITION I5
Humanities/Fine Arts/English & Social Science
Minimum 5 credits in Humanities, minimum 5 credits in Social Science, plus an additional 5 credits in either Humanities or Social Science15
Mathematics
MATH&151CALCULUS I 15
MATH&152CALCULUS II5
MATH&153CALCULUS III5
MATH 215LINEAR ALGEBRA5
MATH 221DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 25
Physics
Complete the following with the required concurrent enrollment: 315
Sequence One
PHYS&241
PHYS 094
ENGINEERING PHYSICS I
and PHYSICS CALCULATIONS (concurrent enrollment required)
5
PHYS&231ENGINEERING PHYSICS LAB I1
Sequence Two
PHYS&242
PHYS 095
ENGINEERING PHYSICS II
and PHYSICS CALCULATIONS (concurrent enrollment required)
5
PHYS&232ENGINEERING PHYSICS LAB II1
Sequence Three
PHYS&243
PHYS 096
ENGINEERING PHYSICS III
and PHYSICS CALCULATIONS (concurrent enrollment required)
5
PHYS&233ENGINEERING PHYSICS LAB III1
Chemistry with Laboratory
CHEM&141
CHEM&151
GENERAL CHEMISTRY I
and GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I
5
CHEM&142
CHEM&152
GENERAL CHEMISTRY II
and GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II
5
Electives
Electives as appropriate for intended major and intended baccalaureate institution. Requirements vary by school and program. See an Engineering faculty advisor for proper selection. 15-20
Computer Programming
Innovation in Design
Calculus IV (Advanced or Multi-Variable Calculus)
3-D Visualization and CAD (Engineering Graphics)
Technical Writing
Thermodynamics
Electrical Circuits
Materials Science
Applied Numerical Methods
Total Credits/Units102

Program Outcomes

Program outcomes are overarching skills that are emphasized and reinforced throughout several courses in a specific program; they are measurable statements that define what students should know or be able to do by the end of a certificate or degree at Clark College. After successful completion of this program, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate progress toward healthier behaviors. (GE)
  • Obtain, evaluate, and ethically use information. (GE)
  • Articulate well-considered ideas and written claims to an academic audience, using effective rhetorical techniques, properly credited evidence, and a command of Standard English. (GE)
  • Interpret the human experience, within appropriate global and historical contexts, through evaluation, analysis, creation, or performance. (GE)
  • Evaluate, analyze, and explain events, behaviors, and institutions using perspectives and methods in the Social Sciences. (GE)
  • Analyze patterns of power, privilege, and inequity in the United States. (GE)
  • Analyze and interpret quantitative information presented verbally, graphically, numerically, and/or symbolically. (GE)
  • Apply communication theory to demonstrate effective oral communication skills.(GE)
  • Demonstrate and clearly explain an effective strategy to solve a quantitative problem. (GE)
  • Acquire scientific and technological information from appropriate sources to examine issues, claims or situations.
  • Analyze and solve multi-step problems using techniques through single-variable calculus.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the derivative as an instantaneous rate of change and the definite integral as a limit of a sum.
  • Apply fundamental principles and relationships from the Natural Sciences to analyze technological or scientific problems.
  • Apply scientific and technological knowledge and methodologies to creatively solve technological or scientific problems.